Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Higgenbotham
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Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

Military.com | By Thomas Novelly
Published September 28, 2022

A new study from the Pentagon shows that 77% of young Americans would not qualify for military service without a waiver due to being overweight, using drugs or having mental and physical health problems.

A slide detailing the findings from the Pentagon's 2020 Qualified Military Available Study shared with Military.com shows a 6% increase from the latest 2017 Department of Defense research that showed 71% of Americans would be ineligible for service.
https://www.military.com/daily-news/202 ... 20problems

This should probably be repeated in the dark age hovel. A lot of this type of thing is indicative of a continuation of a trend of declining life expectancy, also demonstrating reduced quality of life.
While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

Higgenbotham
Posts: 7603
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

Higgenbotham wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:33 am
Guest EDO wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 7:34 am
I still don't see how America will be reduced to medieval England or Edo Japan and yet China won't bomb and enslave us.

Are you saying they will collapse at the same time?
In the Western mind warfare means you bomb someone to oblivion basically and then declare a winner. About 2004, I was having an email exchange with a former coworker who had just retired. I told him we were (are) at war with China. I said it is a low level economic war now, it just started, but it will progress into something more with time. In this email exchange, as I recall it, he replied repeatedly that, "We are not at war with China." That was all he could say. Also, in the Western mind, if someone was benefiting from the war, they could not conceive of it as a war because they were not losing. If his neighbor lost his job because of this war, or his wages didn't keep up with inflation, it was not a war. It just means your neighbor was stupid or unlucky. What's interesting about this right at the moment is BYD, a Chinese company, now has a EV for $13,000 and change that just came out and BYD has overtaken Tesla as the largest seller of EVs in the world. Also, the US has slapped a 100% tariff on these vehicles so effectively the US consumer can't buy them. We don't know if these vehicles are any good, but probably with time they will be. Meanwhile, Tesla stock has been plummeting and now both Republicans and Democrats think these tariffs are a good idea. In the economic war, China appears to be winning so far. Maybe they can keep on with the economic war and crash our markets. Then we'll see if a winner emerges out of that; probably not in my opinion.

I think one characteristic of this dark age is that nobody knows what's really going on. We're in this massive ocean of information without a drop of good, verifiable information. You have to take what anybody says with a grain of salt. There are people trying to take advantage of this and convince others that they are the ones who have good, verifiable information in this ocean of poor, unverifiable information when they actually don't. Yet we still have a need as humans to use our senses to determine what is really happening in our environment. So having said that I look at covid as the ratcheting up of the war with China. I believe covid was released from the Wuhan lab, maybe by accident before it was developed to their satisfaction but, once released, China had a wartime reaction to the release because that's what covid was intended for anyway. That didn't work out well for anyone and there was no winner. That will continue to be the case.

Tesla Stock Price

Image

https://www.cnn.com/2024/05/30/tech/elo ... index.html
My best guess is the Chinese have developed an understanding of the need to change the end goals of war as the world has entered this new dark age. The Americans have not so much. The Chinese believe winning this war means, for one thing, that their enemy collapses but they don't. Then once their enemy collapses, they can do just enough to keep it collapsed, which wouldn't require all that much. I don't think they would see any advantage in bombing us beyond what is necessary to keep us collapsed or in enslaving most of what's left of us. They would not intend to make the same mistake the Americans have made of resurrecting their enemy, then trying to absorb it into their system, like the Americans did with the former Soviets. So as far as what has already gone on in this war and what will go on, it will be oriented toward the Chinese doing things to collapse America, but trying to ensure they do not collapse and the CCP retains power. I don't think that will work but that's what I think they are trying to do.
While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

aeden
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Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2010 12:34 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by aeden »

They as much said the supply chain will flow in relationship to the impediments to its course.
Sometimes some read the books they read also. We discussed this as rope burn to the effective attention span
of the public and its educational maps. One thing we have seen has held the test of time so you cannot waste
any time when they already know the results. As we discussed early Avarice is the spur of greed and the fruit did fall to the ground and rot
as warned.

Higgenbotham
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Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

FullMoon
Posts: 838
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:55 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by FullMoon »

Higgenbotham wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 2:27 pm
Higgenbotham wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:33 am
Guest EDO wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 7:34 am
I still don't see how America will be reduced to medieval England or Edo Japan and yet China won't bomb and enslave us.

Are you saying they will collapse at the same time?
In the Western mind warfare means you bomb someone to oblivion basically and then declare a winner. About 2004, I was having an email exchange with a former coworker who had just retired. I told him we were (are) at war with China. I said it is a low level economic war now, it just started, but it will progress into something more with time. In this email exchange, as I recall it, he replied repeatedly that, "We are not at war with China." That was all he could say. Also, in the Western mind, if someone was benefiting from the war, they could not conceive of it as a war because they were not losing. If his neighbor lost his job because of this war, or his wages didn't keep up with inflation, it was not a war. It just means your neighbor was stupid or unlucky. What's interesting about this right at the moment is BYD, a Chinese company, now has a EV for $13,000 and change that just came out and BYD has overtaken Tesla as the largest seller of EVs in the world. Also, the US has slapped a 100% tariff on these vehicles so effectively the US consumer can't buy them. We don't know if these vehicles are any good, but probably with time they will be. Meanwhile, Tesla stock has been plummeting and now both Republicans and Democrats think these tariffs are a good idea. In the economic war, China appears to be winning so far. Maybe they can keep on with the economic war and crash our markets. Then we'll see if a winner emerges out of that; probably not in my opinion.

I think one characteristic of this dark age is that nobody knows what's really going on. We're in this massive ocean of information without a drop of good, verifiable information. You have to take what anybody says with a grain of salt. There are people trying to take advantage of this and convince others that they are the ones who have good, verifiable information in this ocean of poor, unverifiable information when they actually don't. Yet we still have a need as humans to use our senses to determine what is really happening in our environment. So having said that I look at covid as the ratcheting up of the war with China. I believe covid was released from the Wuhan lab, maybe by accident before it was developed to their satisfaction but, once released, China had a wartime reaction to the release because that's what covid was intended for anyway. That didn't work out well for anyone and there was no winner. That will continue to be the case.

Tesla Stock Price

Image

https://www.cnn.com/2024/05/30/tech/elo ... index.html
My best guess is the Chinese have developed an understanding of the need to change the end goals of war as the world has entered this new dark age. The Americans have not so much. The Chinese believe winning this war means, for one thing, that their enemy collapses but they don't. Then once their enemy collapses, they can do just enough to keep it collapsed, which wouldn't require all that much. I don't think they would see any advantage in bombing us beyond what is necessary to keep us collapsed or in enslaving most of what's left of us. They would not intend to make the same mistake the Americans have made of resurrecting their enemy, then trying to absorb it into their system, like the Americans did with the former Soviets. So as far as what has already gone on in this war and what will go on, it will be oriented toward the Chinese doing things to collapse America, but trying to ensure they do not collapse and the CCP retains power. I don't think that will work but that's what I think they are trying to do.
Defeat the enemy from within without firing a single shot

Aeden has posted the Russian guy talking about that several times I think. Filmed decades ago it's now coming to fruition. But the hubris are conceit of the time prevented it from being believed. Like John's warnings over the years.
If you want to understand the genius behind the Chicom long term vision, research this man. Xi's brain and the most dangerous man in the world. #4 in the CCP but smart enough to stay hidden and influential for 3 successive leaders. Because he's indispensable. He plays the long game as a grandmaster.


Higgenbotham
Posts: 7603
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

Higgenbotham wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 7:39 pm
https://youtu.be/eerb_ZnKp5s?t=1346
After posting my guess of what China is up to, watching the Widdowson video from the time mark to the end and reading the article FullMoon posted added a lot of detail to my knowledge of what China is trying to do. For anyone new to trying to figure out what is really going on in the world, printing the article out that FullMoon posted and reading it from time to time would be helpful. It's probably one of the best 100 articles I've read over the past 20 years.
Higgenbotham wrote:
Fri Dec 23, 2022 12:32 pm
Before discussing that, what comes to mind is what Donald Rumsfeld said about information. Rumsfeld said there are 3 kinds of information. There are things that you know that you know. There are things that you know that you don't know. Finally, there are things that you don't know that you don't know. 20 years ago, I decided to write down things that I know that I know about what is happening in the world. These were just broad categories of things. I have the list in a notebook and it's not handy right now, but there were things like there is a biotech revolution ongoing, there is an information revolution ongoing, there is an unsustainable increase in debt and derivatives, natural resources are becoming harder to extract or scarcer, etc. It wasn't a long list. After doing that exercise, it made me realize there wasn't a lot that I know that I know about the world.
I've been researching the author of the article FullMoon linked. This author has a substack. Below are the first several paragraphs of an article from this substack. This article isn't so enlightening to me because it covers in general terms the themes in this hovel that I am delving into, discussing why and how operating the US in this manner is causing it to fall apart and descend into a new dark age, focusing mostly on the results this system of governance is generating. But it may be a helpful summary. This is the larger issue in my opinion.
The China Convergence
Yes, the West is becoming more like China. Here is the real reason why.

N.S. LYONS
AUG 03, 2023

Well, actually…
Differences and tensions between the United States and China have never been greater. The whole world is dividing itself between the blocs of these two opposing superpowers. A new Cold War is dawning, complete with a global ideological “battle between democracy and autocracy.” Freedom is on the line. The future of global governance will be determined by the winner of this extended competition between two fundamentally opposed political and economic systems – unless a hot war settles the question early with a cataclysmic fight to the death, much as liberal democracy once fought off fascism.

This is the simple and easy narrative of our present moment. In some ways it is accurate: a geopolitical competition really is in the process of boiling over into open confrontation. But it’s also fundamentally shallow and misleading: when it comes to the most fundamental political questions, China and the United States are not diverging but converging to become more alike.

In fact, I can already predict and describe the winner set to prevail in this epochal competition between these two fiercely opposed national systems. In this soon-to-be triumphant system…

Despite a rhetorical commitment to egalitarianism and “democracy,” the elite class deeply distrusts and fears the people over whom it rules. These elites have concentrated themselves into a separate oligarchic political body focused on prioritizing and preserving their rule and their own overlapping set of shared interests. Wracked by anxiety, they strive constantly to maximize their control over the masses, rationalizing a need to forcefully maintain stability in the face of dangerous threats, foreign and domestic. Everything is treated as an emergency. “Safety” and “security” have become be the watchwords of the state, and of society generally.

This elite obsession with control is accelerated by a belief in “scientific management,” or the ability to understand, organize, and run all the complex systems of society like a machine, through scientific principles and technologies. The expert knowledge of how to do so is considered the unique and proprietary possession of the elite vanguard. Ideologically, this elite is deeply materialist, and openly hostile to organized religion, which inhibits and resists state control. They view human beings themselves as machines to be programmed, and, believing the common man to be an unpredictable creature too stupid, irrational, and violent to rule himself, they endeavor to steadily condition and replace him with a better model through engineering, whether social or biological. Complex systems of surveillance, propaganda, and coercion are implemented to help firmly nudge (or shove) the common man into line. Communities and cultural traditions that resist this project are dismantled. Harmfully contrary ideas are systematically censored, lest they lead to dangerous exposure. Governing power has been steadily elevated, centralized, and distributed to a technocratic bureaucracy unconstrained by any accountability to the public.

All of this is justified by a utopian ideological dialectic of historical progress and inevitability. Those more in tune with the tide of history (i.e. elite interests) are held to be morally and intellectually superior, as a class, to backwards reactionary elements. Only certain views are stamped “scientific” and “correct,” although these may change on a political whim. An economism that values only the easily quantifiable reigns as the only moral lodestar, and frictionless efficiency is held up as highest common good; the individual is encouraged to fulfill his assigned role as a docile consumer and cog in the regime’s machine, not that of a self-governing citizen. The state regularly acts to stimulate and manage consumer demand, and to strategically regulate and guide industrial production, and the corporate sector has largely fused itself with the state. Cronyism is rampant.

The relentless political messaging and ideological narrative has come to suffuse every sphere of life, and dissent is policed. Culture is largely stagnant. Uprooted, corralled, and hounded, the people are atomized, and social trust is very low. Reality itself often feels obscured and uncertain. Demoralized, some gratefully accept any security offered by the state as a blessing. At the same time, many citizens automatically assume everything the regime says is a lie. Officialdom in general is a Kafkaesque tragi-comedy of the absurd, something only to be stoically endured by normal people. Yet year by year the pressure to conform only continues to be ratcheted higher…

Which country does this describe? If you can’t quite tell, well, that’s the point. For many citizens of the West, the systems of governance under which we live increasingly feel uncomfortably similar to what appears on offer in the People’s Republic of China.

There are limits to this similarity, of course: the Chinese Communist Party is a brutal regime that has in the past killed tens of millions of its own people and still rules over them with an iron fist. To say that the United States or any other Western country is identical in nature to China would be ridiculous.

And yet, I’m going to argue that commonalities are indeed growing, and that this is no illusion, coincidence, or conspiracy, but the product of the same deep systemic forces and underlying ideological roots. To claim that we’re the same as China, or even just that we’re turning into China (as I’ve admittedly implied with the title) would really just be political clickbait. The reality is more complicated, but no less unsettling: both China and the West, in their own ways and at their own pace, but for the same reasons, are converging from different directions on the same point – the same not-yet-fully-realized system of totalizing techno-administrative governance. Though they remain different, theirs is no longer a difference of kind, only of degree. China is just already a bit further down the path towards the same future.

But how should we describe this form of government that has already begun to wrap its tentacles around the world today, including here in the United States? Many of us recognize by now that whatever it is we now live under, it sure isn’t “liberal democracy.” So what is it? To begin answering that, and to really explain the China Convergence, we’re going to need to start with a crash course on the rise and nature of the technocratic managerial regime in the West.

Part I: The Managerial Regime

“To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.” – George Orwell

Sometime around the second half of the 19th century a revolution in human affairs began to take place, occurring in parallel to and building on the industrial revolution. This was a revolution of mass and scale, which upended nearly every area of human activity and rapidly reorganized civilization, first in the West and then around the world: the limits of time and space produced by geography were swept away by new technologies of communication and transportation; greatly enlarged populations flowed into and swelled vast urban centers; masses of workers began to toil in huge factories, and then in offices, laboring through an endless paper trail trying to keep track of it all; in politics new opportunities arose for those who could seize on the growing power of the masses and their votes, along with new challenges in providing for their growing needs and desires. In government, in business, in education, and in almost every other sphere of life, new methods and techniques of organization emerged in order to manage the growing complexities of mass and scale: the mass bureaucratic state, the mass standing army, the mass corporation, mass media, mass public education, and so on. This was the managerial revolution.[1]

Rapidly accelerating in the 20th century, the managerial revolution soon began to instigate another transformation of society in the West: it gave birth to a new managerial elite. A new social class had arisen out of the growing scale and complexity of mass organizations as those organizations began to find that, in order to function, they had to rely on large numbers of people who possessed the necessary highly technical and specialized cognitive skills and knowledge, including new techniques of organizational planning and management at scale. Such people became the professional managerial class, which quickly expanded to meet the growing demand for their services. While the wealthy families of the old landed aristocratic elite at first continued to own many of these new mass organizations, they soon were no longer capable of operating them, as the traits that had long defined mastery of their role and status – land ownership, inherited warrior virtues, a classical liberal education, formal rhetoric, personal charisma, an extensive code of social manners, etc. – were no longer sufficient or relevant for doing so. This meant the managerial class soon captured de facto control of all the mass organizations of society.

This managerial takeover was accelerated by what I call the managerial doom loop: the larger and more complex an organization grows, the exponentially more managers are needed; managers therefore have a strong incentive to ensure their organization continues to grow larger and more complex, resulting in greater relative power for the managers; more growth means more managers must be hired, who then push for more expansion, including by rationalizing a need for their cancerous bureaucracy to take over ever more functions of the broader economy and society; as more and more territory is surrendered to bureaucratic management, more managers must be educated, which requires more managers…

Anyway, a reckoning over which class now really constituted society’s ruling elite soon became inevitable. In some places the old aristocracy’s end was swift, and bloody. But in most of the West they were not eradicated but coopted and absorbed, with the children of even the wealthiest aristocratic families eventually forced to themselves acquire an education in the same skills, ideas, and mannerisms as the managerial class in order to take on any prominent role, from CEO to politician, to philanthropist. Those who did not do so slowly faded into irrelevance. The managerial class had produced the managerial elite.

This did not mean, however, that the expansion of the new managerial order faced no resistance at all from the old order that it strangled. That previous order, which has been referred to by scholars of the managerial revolution as the bourgeois order, was represented not so much by the grande bourgeoisie (wealthy landed aristocrats and early capitalist industrialists) but by the petite bourgeoisie, or what could be described as the independent middle class.[2] The entrepreneurial small business owner, the multi-generational family shop owners, the small-scale farmer or landlord; the community religious or private educator; even the relatively well-to-do local doctor: these and others like them formed the backbone of a large social and economic class that found itself existentially at odds with the interests of the managerial revolution. But, in contrast to what was originally predicted by Marxists, these bourgeoisie came to be mortally threatened not from below by the laboring, landless proletariat, but from above, by the new order of the managerial elite and their expanding legions of paper-pushing professional revolutionaries. The clash between these classes, as the managerial order steadily encroached on, dismantled, and subsumed more and more of the middle class bourgeois order and its traditional culture, and the increasingly desperate backlash this process generated from its remnants, would come to define much of the political drama of the West. That drama continues in various forms to this day.

The animosity of this class struggle was accentuated by the particularly antagonistic ideology that coalesced as a unifying force for the managerial elite. While this managerial ideology, in its various flavors, presents itself in the lofty language of moral values, philosophical principles, and social goods, it just so happens to rationalize and justify the continual expansion of managerial control into all areas of state, economy, and culture, while elevating the managerial class to a position of not only utilitarian but moral superiority over the rest of society – and in particular over the middle and working classes. This helps serve as a rationale for the managerial elite’s legitimacy to rule, as well as an invaluable means to differentiate, unify, and coordinate the various branches of that elite.

Managerial ideology, a relatively straightforward descendant of the Enlightenment liberal-modernist project, is a formula that consists of several core beliefs, or what could be called core managerial values. At least in the West, these can be distilled into:

1. Technocratic Scientism: The belief that everything, including society and human nature, can and should be fully understood and controlled through scientific and technical means. In this view everything consists of systems, which operate, as in a machine, on the basis of scientific laws that can be rationally derived through reason. Humans and their behavior are the product of the systems in which they are embedded. “Social science” functions in the same way as the physical sciences. These systems can therefore be socially engineered to be improved. Good and bad, like everything else, are scientifically quantifiable. Those with superior scientific and technical knowledge are thus those best placed to understand the cause and effect governing society, and therefore to run it. Ignorance, and the ignorant, are in contrast ultimately the cause of all dysfunction and harm.

2. Utopianism: The belief that a perfect society is possible – in this case through the perfect application of perfect scientific and technical knowledge. The machine can ultimately be tuned to run flawlessly. At that point all will be completely provided for and therefore completely equal, and man himself will be entirely rational, fully free, and perfectly productive. This state of perfection is the telos, or pre-destined end point, of human development (through science, physical and social). This creates the idea of progress, or of moving closer to this final end. Consequently history has a teleology: it bends towards utopia. This also means the future is necessarily always better than the past, as it is closer to utopia. History now takes on moral valence; to “go backwards” is immoral. Indeed even actively conserving the status quo is immoral; governance is only moral in so far as it affects change, thus moving us ever forwards, towards utopia.

3. Meliorism: The belief that all the flaws and conflicts of human society, and of human beings themselves, are problems that can and should be directly ameliorated by sufficient managerial technique. Poverty, war, disease, criminality, ignorance, suffering, unhappiness, death… none are examples of the human condition that will always be with us, but are all problems to be solved. It is the role of the managerial elite to identify and solve such problems by applying their expert knowledge to improve human institutions and relationships, as well as the natural world. In the end there are no tradeoffs, only solutions.

4. Liberationism: The belief that individuals and society are held back from progress by the rules, restraints, relational bonds, historical communities, inherited traditions, and limiting institutions of the past, all of which are the chains of false authority from which we must be liberated so as to move forwards. Old ideas, old culture, old customs, and old habits must all be dismantled in order to ameliorate human problems, as old systems and ways of life are necessarily ignorant, flawed, and oppressive. Newer – and therefore superior – scientific knowledge can re-design, from the ground up, new systems and ways of life that will function more efficiently and morally.

5. Hedonistic Materialism: The belief that complete human happiness and well-being fundamentally consists of and is achievable through the fulfillment of a sufficient number of material needs and psychological desires. The presence of any unfulfilled desire or discomfort indicates the systemic inefficiency of an un-provided good that can and should be met in order to move the human being closer to a perfected state. Scientific management can and should therefore to the greatest extent possible maximize the fulfillment of desires. For the individual, consumption that alleviates desire is a moral act. In contrast, repression (including self-repression) of desires and their fulfillment stands in the way of human progress, and is immoral, signaling a need for managerial liberation.

6. Homogenizing Cosmopolitan Universalism: The belief that: a) all human beings are fundamentally interchangeable and members of a single universal community; b) that the systemic “best practices” discovered by scientific management are universally applicable in all places and for all people in all times, and that therefore the same optimal system should rationally prevail everywhere; c) that, while perhaps quaint and entertaining, any non-superficial particularity or diversity of place, culture, custom, nation, or government structure anywhere is evidence of an inefficient failure to successfully converge on the ideal system; and d) that any form of localism, particularism, or federalism is therefore not only inefficient and backwards but an obstacle to human progress and so is dangerous and immoral. Progress will always naturally entail centralization and homogenization.

7. Abstraction and Dematerialization: The belief, or more often the instinct, that abstract and virtual things are better than physical things, because the less tied to the messy physical world humans and their activities are, the more liberated and capable of pure intellectual rationality and uninhibited morality they will become. Practically, dematerialization, such as through digitalization or financialization, is a potent solvent that can help burn away the repressive barriers created by attachments to the particularities of place and people, replacing them with the fluidity and universality of the cosmopolitan. Dematerialization makes property more easily tradable, and can more effectively produce homogenization and fulfill desires at scale. Indeed in theory dematerialization could allow almost everything to take on and be managed at vastly greater, even infinite, mass and scale, holding out the hope of total efficiency: a state of pure frictionlessness, in which change (progress) will be effortless and limitless. Finally, dematerialization also most broadly represents an ideological belief that it is the world that should conform to abstract theory, not theory that must conform to the world.

Combined, the promotion of these seven managerial values served as a convenient ideological means for the managerial system to challenge the existing ethic and values of the middle-class bourgeois order that preceded it. These bourgeois values consisted of a mix of conservative and classical liberal values. Nowhere were these values once more distinct than in America, where they had developed into a recognizable blend that included: a strong preference for local governance, grass-roots democracy, and an aversion to top-down control; an accepted diversity of regional and local folkways and traditions; a general mythic ideal of spirited individualism and energetic self-reliance; a countervailing tradition of tight-knit family life and exceptionally widespread participation in a proliferation of thick religious, community, and civic associations and affiliations (as most famously described by Alexis de Tocqueville); “Protestant work ethic,” and an attention to thrift and self-discipline as moral virtues; an intimate connection to the land, and a very strong attachment to middle-class property ownership as central to republican self-governance and the national character; political realism and a conservative aversion to too rapid and radical of change.

The contrasting values of managerial ideology were perfectly structured to invert, undermine, marginalize, disrupt, and dismantle every one of these bourgeois values simultaneously, steadily subverting the ideological basis for bourgeois legitimacy intellectually, morally, and politically, thus clearing the way to justify the establishment of an alternative political system of rule by the new managerial elite.
https://theupheaval.substack.com/p/the- ... onvergence
While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

Higgenbotham
Posts: 7603
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

Higgenbotham wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:39 am
This article isn't so enlightening to me because it covers in general terms the themes in this hovel that I am delving into, discussing why and how operating the US in this manner is causing it to fall apart and descend into a new dark age, focusing mostly on the results this system of governance is generating.
This will be my next project in this Dark Age Hovel: to go through all 214 pages of this hovel and summarize the factual information regarding the outputs that the managerial elite class overseeing the United States has actually generated.
While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

FullMoon
Posts: 838
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:55 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by FullMoon »

An interesting thing about the CCP leadership is that both the leader and his wingman lived and studied in the USA. And then after opening up to the world, decided to reverse course and close down. They think that they know the weak points in our armor and can exploit them. Which they've been actively doing for a long time. John said many times that they're actively preparing for war with us and it was hard to believe given the power disparity. But the future has become the now. And the unstoppable force is meeting the unmovable object. John also said it ended well. The living will wish they were dead(feel like they're dead?). What was that he's said many times?

Higgenbotham
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Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:28 pm

Re: Higgenbotham's Dark Age Hovel

Post by Higgenbotham »

FullMoon wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2024 2:39 pm
The living will wish they were dead(feel like they're dead?). What was that he's said many times?
The living will envy the dead before this is over.
While the periphery breaks down rather slowly at first, the capital cities of the hegemon should collapse suddenly and violently.

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